Helping those who help, defending refugees’ rights and dignity

Fri, 20/07/2018 - 15:34

Redacció

Cooperation. Assessment of the agreement with Stop Mare Mortum to provide legal advice for asylum seekers.

Stop Mare Mortum has received municipal economic support to help 319 people and bring a further 116 to the Spanish state who were stranded in Greece and in need of international protection.

In light of the Spanish state’s failure to comply with the EU programme for relocating asylum seekers arriving in Greece and Italy, the City Council signed an agreement with the organisation Stop Mare Mortum in 2016 to provide legal support, facilitate safe routes and promote dignified stays for asylum seekers looking to be relocated in Spain.

The City Council maintains its commitment to demand more power from the state when it comes to taking in refugees in cities, urging the central government to streamline procedures and receive over 18,000 asylum seekers, fulfilling the quota which the country pledged to meet for the EU relocation programme.

With the help of municipal economic support for the sum off 60,000 euros, Stop Mare Mortum has been able to attend to 319 people stranded in Greece and in need of international protection. Many people arriving at refugee camps have been given inaccurate information on rights and the procedures to follow to be relocated to a different EU country. The relocation programme is governed by a principle of solidarity among EU member states, whereby all countries must take in a certain number of asylum seekers, established using a quota system.

The work carried out by the association consisted of providing legal advice to help people get to Spain via the relocation programme, as well as working to apply political pressure by denouncing violations by the state in its duty to take in 19,449 people through the relocation programme.

High court ruling against the state over the reception of asylum seekers

In the context of the collaboration agreement with the City Council, Stop Mare Mortum filed a case with the Spanish High Court in 2017, requiring the central government to fulfil its obligations on relocating its quota of asylum seekers. A few days ago, the court condemned the state for failing to meet its quota and ordering it to take in over 18,000 people.

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